Functional training

What is functional training?

Functional training focuses on practicing complex movements instead of training individual muscles. An athletic full-body workout that meets the demands of everyday life or sports-specific movements.

This free, multi-jointed and multidimensional training with and without additional equipment improves stability, balance and mobility as well as coordination for more well-being and performance in everyday life and during sport.

Functional training is an everyday-relevant and cross-sport form of training.

Who benefits of functional training?

Do you want to become stronger, more flexible, more coordinated, more enduring, while still building up muscles and losing fat?

Do you want to get better at your sport and therefore work on your weak points? Or do you want to prepare for a competition and you are missing the finishing touches?

Have you been injured and now want to start again with an adapted training?

At the beginning of my individual care there is a detailed anamnesis and a comprehensive diagnosis.

I offer to you:

Your personal target and my program tailored to you will lead you to success.

Functional training for everyone:

Most people today have a sedentary job combined with work on the computer, i.e. they usually sit on a chair for eight hours with their arms in front of their bodies. The typical posture here is rolling the shoulders forward and rounding the lower back. The result is that the front shoulder, chest and abdominal muscles as well as the hip flexors shorten. The neck muscles and the lower back are therefore under tension all the time. In most cases, this leads to long-term tension. By shortening the hip flexor, the pelvis tilts forward, which intensifies the “curling up” effect.

Unfortunately, the so-called “desk offender” is usually not a trained athlete who has a trained perception of his body and thus counteracts imbalances in a targeted manner. At the beginning there is always awareness, i.e. the training of proprioception, then comes the opening or straightening of the body, so to speak a reset.

Once the target has been set, priorities can be set, e.g. a simultaneous weight loss, a more athletic body image or a body toning or an improvement of the cardiovascular performance.

Body awareness training
Improve mobility
Improve coordination
Improve balance

Functional training for golfers:

The game of golf requires a high degree of coordination between different muscle groups. Good mobility and body tension are important for this. Physical restrictions, such as a poor trunk stability or an immobile shoulder girdle have a negative impact on the game.

With functional training, you can do both specifically eliminate these restrictions and increase your overall body awareness. This leads to more flexibility and better coordination. This makes it easier to develop automatisms in the game.

Improvement of trunk stability
Mobilization of the shoulder girdle
Mobilization of the pelvis
Body awareness training

Functional training for tennis players:

If we look at the profile of the requirements of a tennis player, we see that both agility and speed play a major role. In the first place, the movement amplitude of the shoulder should be mentioned, because this is extremely important for the backstroke before touching the racket with the ball serve, forehand or backhand is played. The mobility of the shoulder girdle is therefore a priority in functional training for a tennis player.
At the same time, the game actions and frequent changes of direction require a high degree of anticipation, ability to react, coordination and speed. The strokes in general, but especially the service, require a great deal of force to be developed when touching the ball.
These different requirements can all be optimized with a functional training program.

Mobilization of the shoulder girdle
Improve mobility
Speed strength training
Training of responsiveness

Functional training for cyclists:

A strong core is a great advantage when cycling. Only with a stable torso it is possible to bring enough strength from the legs to the pedals. But you also need a high degree of mobility in the hips and lower back. Without this, the power transmission will ultimately not function optimally, as the maximum power cannot be passed on from the gluteal muscle.

Cycling is not a natural movement like running or walking, so it can cause muscular imbalances and changes in the postural system. Sitting for hours in the bent position promotes the shortening of the hip flexor and thus the tilting of the front pelvis. For cyclists, the focus of functional training should therefore be on core stability and mobility.

Improvement of trunk stability
Mobilization of the pelvis
Mobilization of the lower back
Improve mobility

Functional training for runners:

Poor posture in everyday life also affects running. If a runner cannot maintain the upright position of the pelvic area due to weak back muscles, the pelvic blades rotate backwards. This has a negative impact on the dynamics of the running step, because there are many muscle attachments in this area. The lever function of the entire muscle chain for the legs is consequently hindered. Here, too, the stability of the torso and the training of body awareness are the top priorities of functional training.

Furthermore, in preparation for a competition, the speed, which is important for sprinting, can be improved through targeted exercises.

Body awareness training
Improvement of trunk stability
Speed strength training
Improve mobility

Functional training after rehab:

If the acute phase of an illness or injury is over and the treatment by the physiotherapist has been completed, an adapted functional training can follow. This is useful because many exercises are performed with one leg or one arm, so you can choose different load levels. In addition, trust in one’s own body must be restored. Therefore, exercises that train flexibility, balance and coordination are particularly useful.

Body awareness training
Training of the atrophied muscles
counteract muscular imbalances

Contact us now

I would be delighted to meet you soon in a free personal interview and to advise you as your personal trainer!